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BlackWW2Museum.org

The Museum of Black WW II History

has moved to Stamford CT

Click here to contact us at the Temporary Office

Opening Date - TBA


The Purpose of this Museum

This museum is the only one of its kind in the U.S.  The museum was created not to glorify war but to document it -- in particular to honor the long-ignored role of African-Americans in the largest worldwide conflict of human history.

The Museum's goal is to enlighten visitors

To enlighten visitors about the relatively unknown and unappreciated contribution of the 1.1 million African-Americans who served in the U.S. military in World War II.  More than a collection and display of objects, the museum is a center for ongoing teaching and research on this broad subject.



Bruce Bird
Founder and Curator

MUSEUM OF BLACK WW II HISTORY

MEDIA BLITZ/DISPLAY/EXHIBIT/ARTIFACTS

SATURDAY, August 20, 2016

3:00 Pm to 6:00 pm

HONORING

The 1.1 million AFRICAN AMERICANS

(7,093) AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN)

Who served in WORLD WAR II

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Thank you Bevmax for helping the museum of black WW II get a building!!!!!!!!

TBA

BEV MAX

THE WINE & LIQUOR SUPERSTORE!

RIDGEWAY BEVERAGES

2202 BEDFORD STREET

STAMFORD, CT  06905

TEL. 203-348-6810


INFORMATION:  PLEASE CALL MABEL WENSLEY JORGENSEN



World War II

It was not until World War II (1942) that women were officially allowed to serve in great numbers in the armed forces. The Army had the Women's Army Corps (WAC); the Navy had Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES); and the Coast Guard had the SPARS. The majority of African-American women served in the WAC. They remained in segregated units, as did the African-American men. Although the Navy intended to increase the number of African-Americans to 10 percent, there were still less than 50 Black WAVES by 1945. The U.S. Coast Guard had even less in the SPARS. Out of the highest number of women in the military during this period (271,000), only 4,000 were African-American women, simply because there just weren't any opportunities for them. African-American women continued to serve from the Korean Conflict through Viet Nam to Operation Desert Storm.


During WWII the first all black WAC group to serve overseas was the 6888th Postal Unit in England and then France. Here Major Charity Adams reviews the troops in Birmingham England. (National Archives).

Desert Storm

African-American women served with distinction during Operation Desert Storm, as officers, noncommissioned officers, and enlisted soldiers. Of the 35,000 females who went to Desert Storm, an estimated 40 percent of them were African-Americans. According to SSG Betty Brown of the Washington, DC, Army National Guard, all of these women endured the heat and the primitive conditions: no electricity, no running water, no bathrooms, and the sanitation details (cleaning the 10 gallon trash cans that served as toilets).

An African-American woman, LT Phoebe Jeter, who headed an all-male platoon, ordered 13 Patriots fired (anti-missile missiles), destroying at least two Scuds (Iraqi surface-to-surface missiles). (15:100) Another African-American woman, CPT Cynthia Mosely, commanded Alpha Company, 24th Support Battalion Forward, 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized), a 100-person unit that supplied everything from fuel to water to ammunition. Her unit resupplied fuel for all of the forward brigades because it was closest to the front lines.


Ensign Matice Wright, the Navy`s first black female naval flight officer,poses for DOD photograph.
Wright was assigned to Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 3 (VQ-3). Date: 01 MAY 1993

These women who served in the military since pre-colonial days have paved the way for new recruits and current active duty females to follow. When we look at the statistical data of African-American women entering the military, we find that Black women in FY 1993 comprised 33 percent of Army female recruits, 22 percent of Navy female recruits, 17 percent of Marine Corps female recruits and 18 percent of Air Force female recruits. (21:2-10) Today the statistics tell us that 30.3 percent of the military is African-American women; approximately 33.6 percent serve as enlisted, and 13.1 percent serve as commissioned and warrant officers.


Sgt Danyell E. Wilson, first black woman Tomb Sentinel

The following African-American females have attained the rank of general officer: currently on active duty, BG Marcelite Jorden-Harris, Director Maintenance, Headquarters United States Air Force/LG, and retired from the U.S. Army BG Clara L. Adams-Ender and BG Sherian G. Cadoria.


BGEN Marcelite Harris.

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